Remember the Woodpecker?

October 10, 2007

This massive ULF (ultra low frequency) assembly, a part of the Duga-3 array, is over a mile long. ULF (ultra low frequency) waves easily penetrate the earth, and lots of other dense matter. From 1976 – 1989 it sent out a powerful 10Hz wave that sounded a lot like a low frequency woodpecker. The way interrupted broadcasts, amateur radio, and utility transmissions resulting in THOUSANDS of complaints from various countries.

That was a long time ago. Wireless wasn’t so important back then. It is now.

If Russia ever turns this back on, or if someone else builds their own and does the same, we should expect two things…

  1. More bricked iPhones (many other wireless devices will also be bricked)
  2. We might go crazy

That’s the other horrible thing about microwaves. They can affect our brains. Current technology isn’t up for mind-control, but you don’t have to control someone’s mind to make them go insane.

Still don’t get it? Go to your TV. Turn it on and find some snow (aka white-noise). Now turn up the volume and try to concentrate. Then imagine that bliss 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

Don’t you wish we had one? We have something sort-of similar, it’s called HAARP. It runs on UHF (ultra high frequencies), which do not penetrate the earth easily. However, HAARP transmissions could probably bounce around inside the ionosphere and cause problems that way.

Anwayz, I’m not saying our friendly Russian neighbors will ever turn The Woodpecker on again, but it is scary to think about. Especially since this has been used before and we know it does work. Let’s hope it’s torn down and the metal is turned into a bridge or something.

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How many Windows Mobile users have been lusting after the iPhone’s finger flicking functionality? I know I have. Finger flickin’ is useful and a fun effect. Last night I decided I would make it mine the hard way (coding).

So I got started around 9pm, this video is what I ended up with around 1am. The video might not do it justice, but it works wonderfully. It’s very responsive and there is no screen-flicker. I was surprised how simple this actually was.

Basically there are only six strings I’m drawing with the text. Those move to give the illusion that the list is scrolling. The painting is done by overriding the OnPaint event. I implemented double-buffering there to prevent any flickers.

If you’re interested in a copy of the source code just fire me an email.

Why aren’t the feminists in America focused on ending the slaughter of young women in China and India? I’m not talking about abortion. I’m talking about the murder of babies; young girls, the handicapped or other unwanted children.

It’s sad but it’s nothing new. Back in 200BC the Greeks were doing this with a smile on their face. I bet you weren’t taught about this in Public School. You probably weren’t told about the ugly side of the Greeks because they are the beloved of academia. The Greeks were pigs in so many ways…but I digress. The current champions of death today are China and India.

Here’s a recent true story from India…

Lakshmi already had one daughter, so when she gave birth to a second girl, she killed her. For the three days of her second child’s short life, Lakshmi admits, she refused to nurse her. To silence the infant’s famished cries, the impoverished village woman squeezed the milky sap from an oleander shrub, mixed it with castor oil, and forced the poisonous potion down the newborn’s throat. The baby bled from the nose, then died soon afterward. Female neighbors buried her in a small hole near Lakshmi’s square thatched hut of sunbaked mud. They sympathized with Lakshmi, and in the same circumstances, some would probably have done what she did. For despite the risk of execution by hanging and about 16 months of a much-ballyhooed government scheme to assist families with daughters, in some hamlets of … Tamil Nadu, murdering girls is still sometimes believed to be a wiser course than raising them. “A daughter is always liabilities. How can I bring up a second?” Lakshmi, 28, answered firmly when asked by a visitor how she could have taken her own child’s life eight years ago. “Instead of her suffering the way I do, I thought it was better to get rid of her.”

Quote by John-Thor Dahlburg writing for the LA Times in his article, “Where killing baby girls ‘is no big sin'”

Things are worse in China where girls are considered “maggots in the rice.” Read on if you have the stomach…

…culture dictates that when a girl marries she leaves her family and becomes part of her husband’s family. For this reason Chinese peasants have for many centuries wanted a son to ensure there is someone to look after them in their old age — having a boy child is the best pension a Chinese peasant can get. Baby girls are even called “maggots in the rice”…Quote from “Gendercide and Genocide” by Adam Jones

 

I’m not disillusioned by this horrific tragedy. I know many wonderful people from China and India. That’s why I believe we can prevent this from happening. The people of the world need to be more vocal about our disapproval of these egregious acts.

If you care about this topic you might consider getting involved. It’s actually easier then you might think. There’s more than one website dedicated to stopping Gendercide, you could simply surf over to http://www.gendercide.org/ and signup for their mailing list.

It would only take seconds to become part of the solution instead of part of the problem, but I bet you won’t take the time. My experience has been that most people want to ignore problems like this. You’d probably rather pretend it doesn’t exist.

Fact or Fiction?

October 3, 2007

Recently a sixth-grade teacher brought up the Iraq war in her classroom. She said America was doing terrible things in Iraq, and that we needed to leave as soon as possible.

Unbeknownst to the teacher one of her new students recently lost her older brother in Iraq. This little girl proudly rebutted, “My brother went to Iraq to fix things. They killed him for trying to help. He’s in heaven now.”

The teacher rolled her eyes. Dedicated to the idea that she needed to educate her students on the harsh world around them she responded, “I’m sorry to tell you this, but if he was fighting in Iraq then he wasn’t helping anyone.”The little girl looked hurt for a second. Then she swallowed hard and said, “Oh yeah, when I get to heaven I’ll ask him.”

Irritated at the child’s response the teacher sharply replied, “What if he went to hell!?!”

Immediately the little girl spouted back, “Then you ask him!”

Parsing a PodCast in C#

October 2, 2007

Recently I assimilated the Windows Media Player into one of my projects, today I decided to add PodCast capabilities.

I was surprised how easy this was, I guess I’d expected more of a challenge. I went into this knowing nothing about PodCasts, once I realized it was RSS I knew this would be easy. RSS used to be Rich Site Summary, until people figured out how useful it was and renamed it Really Simple Syndication.

I know this is really simple code, frankly that’s part of why I’m posting it. Simple examples save people time. I tried to find a quick Copy+Paste solution for Podcasts on Google just before I wrote this. After three minutes of searching I quit and spent five writing this.

The example I wrote is a console application (yes, it runs from the DOS prompt) that grabs a Podcast page and loops through all the Podcast listings. I use console apps for examples because there isn’t a lot too them. This helps coders quickly Copy+Paste the code they need from my examples.

So without further adieu, this is how simple it is to do Podcasts in C#…

//This is always included in Console applications.
using
System;

//This contains the XmlDocument, XmlNodeList and Node objects used below.
using
System.Xml;

namespace ExamplePodCastParser
{

class Program
{

static void Main(string[] args)
{

//This loads the Podcast
XmlDocument doc = new XmlDocument();
doc.Load(http://obama.senate.gov/podcast/index.xml”);

//This builds a list of the Item nodes
XmlNodeList items = doc.SelectNodes(“//item”);

//This loops through the list and writes out the title and URL.
for (int i = 0; i < items.Count; i++)
{
Console.WriteLine(items[i].SelectSingleNode(“title”).InnerText);
Console.WriteLine(items[i].SelectSingleNode(“enclosure”).Attributes[“url”].Value);
}

}

}

}

 

Click here to download the Visual Studio project.

Taken from the latest Google news headlines, “Radiohead Shuns iTunes, Sells New Album Online Direct” I’m thrilled. All bands should sell their music direct. Who needs to music industry?

Click here to pre-order their latest CD titled, “inrainbows”. Radiohead seems to be doing this the right way. You can either pay to download the song, or pay for a CD. If you buy the CD you get a free download. That’s the way everyone should do it.

I hope Radiohead makes a billion dollars on this CD. I think they could help change things by illustrating how much more profitable it is to cut out the suits.